Verba is here! Download it on iOS and Android

Verba is here!
Download it on iOS and Android

Capturing thoughts for your session with notes

Capturing thoughts for your session with notes

Jun 15, 2024

Our lives move in a constant cognitive flow of thoughts, memories, reactions and mental narratives arising throughout each day. Therefore, it can be tremendously helpful to take notes periodically on the threads you want to revisit and dive deeper into with your therapist.

Making "session notes" accomplishes a few valuable things. First, it enhances your own self-tracking abilities between appointments. You start noticing the recurring themes, cognitive patterns or emotional undercurrents that color your daily experience. Secondly, having a record of your most provocative thoughts provides an insightful window into your psyche for your therapist to better understand your mindset. And finally, notes serve as handy personal prompts so you don't lose track of the nuanced realizations you want to dedicatedly process.

Here are some ways for effectively capturing your thought trails to review in your next session:

Keep a digital or hardcopy journal

Experiment with what format suits your particular style - Voice memo recordings, a note-taking app, or an old-fashioned pen-and-paper journal. Find the medium that allows you to most fluidly record your observations in the moment before they slip away.

Focus on intensity, not frequency

You don't need to transcribe every single thought. Pay attention to the ideas, memories or emotional reactions that carry an insistent urgency or heat signature. Those are usually the meaningful signals worth delving into.

Capture metaphoric imagery

The psyche often speaks through symbolic language and imagistic representations. If thoughts arise in the form of fragmented visuals, felt bodily sensations or poetic metaphors - write those down! Your unconscious may be expressing itself more vividly through such non-literal channels.

Note exemplifying moments

If you're working on a certain therapeutic theme or issue, watch for representative moments or interactions where that core conflict, pattern or emotional Truth manifested particularly clearly. Jot down the circumstances as a potent case study to analyze.

Make a intention to revisit

As you accumulate these brief thought entries throughout the weeks, make a note to yourself to remember bringing your journal for discussion. Or snap photos of any pages you want to review. Having your own artifacts can helpfully guide the session.

Capturing provocative thoughts for review becomes like an insightful travelogue illuminating your mental landscape between sessions. The richer documentation you can provide, the deeper your therapist can understand you and the more fruitful your work together becomes.

Our lives move in a constant cognitive flow of thoughts, memories, reactions and mental narratives arising throughout each day. Therefore, it can be tremendously helpful to take notes periodically on the threads you want to revisit and dive deeper into with your therapist.

Making "session notes" accomplishes a few valuable things. First, it enhances your own self-tracking abilities between appointments. You start noticing the recurring themes, cognitive patterns or emotional undercurrents that color your daily experience. Secondly, having a record of your most provocative thoughts provides an insightful window into your psyche for your therapist to better understand your mindset. And finally, notes serve as handy personal prompts so you don't lose track of the nuanced realizations you want to dedicatedly process.

Here are some ways for effectively capturing your thought trails to review in your next session:

Keep a digital or hardcopy journal

Experiment with what format suits your particular style - Voice memo recordings, a note-taking app, or an old-fashioned pen-and-paper journal. Find the medium that allows you to most fluidly record your observations in the moment before they slip away.

Focus on intensity, not frequency

You don't need to transcribe every single thought. Pay attention to the ideas, memories or emotional reactions that carry an insistent urgency or heat signature. Those are usually the meaningful signals worth delving into.

Capture metaphoric imagery

The psyche often speaks through symbolic language and imagistic representations. If thoughts arise in the form of fragmented visuals, felt bodily sensations or poetic metaphors - write those down! Your unconscious may be expressing itself more vividly through such non-literal channels.

Note exemplifying moments

If you're working on a certain therapeutic theme or issue, watch for representative moments or interactions where that core conflict, pattern or emotional Truth manifested particularly clearly. Jot down the circumstances as a potent case study to analyze.

Make a intention to revisit

As you accumulate these brief thought entries throughout the weeks, make a note to yourself to remember bringing your journal for discussion. Or snap photos of any pages you want to review. Having your own artifacts can helpfully guide the session.

Capturing provocative thoughts for review becomes like an insightful travelogue illuminating your mental landscape between sessions. The richer documentation you can provide, the deeper your therapist can understand you and the more fruitful your work together becomes.

View all blog articles

Today's tune

Capture your life, track your mental health and recall it in session with Verba

Learn more

Capture your life, track your mental health and recall it in session with Verba

Learn more

Capture your life, track your mental health and recall it in session with Verba

Learn more

Advait Naik

Advait is the founder of Verba and works at the intersection of psychology, design and technology to create a product that can help humans be more self aware through clarity